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Archive for the ‘beads’ Category

WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH BEADS?

Posted by learntobead on June 22, 2013

WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH BEADS?

beads3

A BEAD is anything that has a hole in it. And you can do a lot of things with things that have holes.

Below is a list we generated here in the shop. Can you think of anything else to add to the list?

Have you done anything out-of-the-ordinary with your beads?

Warren

beads2

You can put these things on string.

You can sew these things onto fabric.

You can weave these things together with threads.

You can knot or braid or knit or crochet these things together.

You can combine and wrap and en-cage these things with metal wires and metal sheets.

You can work these things into projects with clay, polymer clay and metal clay.

You can embellish whatever you can think of – dolls, tapestries, clothes, shoes, scrapbooks, pillows, containers, and vases.

You can use these things in scientific experiments.

You can fuse these things together.

You can incorporate these things into projects involving stained glass, mosaics, or multi-media art.

You can decorate your house and your household things with these things.

You can texture surfaces with these things, using glues, cements or resins.

You can buy these pre-made, or make your own.

beads4

You can do a lot of things with beads. Most people begin by Stringing beads, and graduate to things like Weaving beads, Embellishing with beads on Fiber, Knotting and Braiding with beads, and Wire Working with beads. A few people learn to hand-make Lampwork glass beads, or learn to sculpt with Polymer Clay or Precious Metal Clay, or learn to solder using Silver-Smithing techniques.

And you can feel self-satisfied and secure in the knowledge that, should everything else in the world around you go to pot, we will all be back to bartering with beads.

And you will have them.

So, beads are good.

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Posted in beads | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

So You Want To Do Craft Shows…

Posted by learntobead on May 8, 2013

SO YOU WANT TO DO CRAFT SHOWS…
New CraftArtEdu.com Video Tutorial By Warren Feld
http://www.craftartedu.com/warren-feld-so-you-want-to-do-craft-shows

cf-naples-fair2
In this class, presented in 6 parts with 16 lessons, artist and businessman, Warren Feld, will fill you in on the ins and outs, the dos and the don’ts of selling at craft shows and fairs. Which are best for you, which may be a waste of your time. How to compute the revenue you must earn to justify participating in an event. This is a must see class for anyone thinking of entering the art and craft show world and will maximize your chances of success in these venues. 6 Broadcasts.
Price:
$30
Level: All Levels
Duration: 113:58

Posted in bead weaving, beads, beadwork, business of craft, jewelry making, Resources | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

FASHION AND JEWELRY DESIGN

Posted by learntobead on May 6, 2013

TO WHAT DEGREE DOES/SHOULD “FASHION” INFLUENCE OUR JEWELRY DESIGN DECISIONS?

reposted from my Jewelry Design Discussion Group on FaceBook
https://www.facebook.com/groups/jewelrydesign/

pearl10-full-moneyshot-hi-res-medium

In our store, I am asked repeatedly about what the current fashion colors are? Did I see what so-and-so was wearing on TV or at an awards show? But usually, at least in Nashville, TN, a sense of fashion plays a small part in the day-to-day decisions most people make about the jewelry they want to wear.

What are your feelings and views? What are your experiences? What role should “Fashion” play? How important is Fashion to jewelry design? Should we take our design “cues” from New York and Los Angeles? To what extent do you think Fashion influences the average woman’s choices she makes, when purchasing or wearing a piece of jewelry?

Warren Feld

ctamayadetail1

From an article I wrote… APPLIED FASHION Women don’t just wear pieces of jewelry – they inhabit them.

Buying a piece of jewelry for yourself – a necklace, a bracelet, earrings, a brooch, something else – isn’t a task easily given to someone else. It’s often not a spur of the moment thing either. You just don’t rush off to the local boutique or the local Wal-Mart, grab whatever you see, and go home. I’m not talking about that impulse buy during your leisurely visit to the mall. I’m referring to purchasing those pieces of jewelry you know will have to do a lot of the hard work to accessorize your wardrobe and help you get the compliments and notice of your family, friends and   co-workers you comport with and compete with each and every day.

No, buying a piece of jewelry for yourself is a multi-purposed moment, one which must be thought through carefully and one which must be savored. Lest you buy the wrong piece. That doesn’t really go with what you intend to wear. Or is over-priced. Or poorly made. Or conveys the wrong impression about status. Or is out of fashion. Or something one of your friends already has.

The jewelry you buy has to conform to quite a long list of essential criteria before you could ever think of buying it. It is something you will wear more than once. As such, it is your companion. Your necklace is not merely lying around your neck. Or your bracelet around your wrist. Or your earrings dangling from your ears. Jewelry can cause you to lose face with others. It can irritate or scratch your skin, or get caught up in your hair. It might weigh you down or stretch or tear your ear lobes. Jewelry can break without warning in the most unexpected and embarrassing of places. It can get caught on things, sometimes hurting you in the process.

Jewelry conveys to the world something about who you really are, or think you are. As such, jewelry is very personal. Your private, innermost, most soul searching choices made very public for all to see. As you caress it, as you touch the smooth or faceted or crevice’d beads and metal parts or the clasp or the material the beads are strung on, when you twist and move the piece within your hand, you are confirming to yourself the extent to which your jewelry is doing its job.

When you buy new jewelry, the dilemmas multiply. How will the new compare to the old? Will it be able to handle all these responsibilities – looking good, representing you, fitting in with your wardrobe, meeting the expectations of others? Like divorcing, then remarrying, changing your jewelry can take some time for readjustment. And you do not want to be seen as noncommittal to your jewelry. This would sort of be like going to a hotel, but not unpacking your suitcase while staying in the room.

Conveying some sort of social or psychological distance from your jewelry can be very unsettling for others. So you need to inhabit it. You need to inhabit your jewelry, wear it with conviction, pride and satisfaction. Be one with it. Inhabiting jewelry often comes with a price. There becomes so much pressure to buy the “right” pieces, given all the roles we demand our jewelry to play, that we too often stick with the same brands, the same colors, the same styles, the same silhouettes.

We get stuck in this rut and are afraid to step out of it. Or we wear too many pieces of jewelry. The long earrings, plus the cuff bracelets on both arms, plus the head band, plus the hair ornament, plus the 7-strand necklace, plus the 5 rings. We are ever uncertain which piece or pieces will succeed at what, so hopefully, at least some combination or subset of what we wear will work out.

In a similar way, we wear over-embellished pieces – lots of charms, lots of dangles, lots of fringe, lots of strands. Something will surely be the right color, the right fit and proportion, the right fashion, the right power statement, the right reflection of me.

And our need to inhabit our jewelry comes with one more price. We are too willing to overpay for poorly made pieces in our desperation to have that right look. The $100.00 of beads strung on elastic string. The poorly dyed stones which fade in the light. The poorly crimped and overly stiff pieces with little ease for accommodating movement and frequent wear. It is OK to inhabit our jewelry. In fact, it is necessary, given all we want jewelry to do for us. But we need to be smart about it. We need to learn to recognize better designs and better designers.

This need not be expensive at all.

Just smarter.

Posted in bead weaving, beads, beadwork, jewelry design, jewelry making | Tagged: , , | 3 Comments »

Call For Submissions: SHOWCASE 1000 BEADS, Lark Pub.

Posted by learntobead on February 5, 2013

Call For Submissions:
Showcase 1000 Beads
Lark Publications
2/14/13 deadline

Lark Jewelry & Beading (http://www.facebook.com/LarkJewelryBeading) seeks
excellent photographs of original, contemporary beads in all materials to
publish in a new juried, international collection in our 500 Series of
books: Showcase 1000 Beads. This book is scheduled to be published in
January 2014. The book will be juried by glass beadmaker Kristina Logan.

We welcome and encourage submission of photographs of your handmade beads in
all materials, including glass, metal, polymer clay, metal clay, ceramics,
paper, fiber, plastic, wood, stone, etc., and in all design styles. All work
must be made no earlier than 2010, and the more recent the work the better;
we would prefer to see your 2012 work over your 2011 work, and your 2011
work over your 2010 work.

We strongly prefer images of beads that have not been published previously,
and please do NOT submit images of pieces that have been published in any
Lark book. We can accept only high-quality digital images. Artists will
receive full acknowledgment within the book and a complimentary copy.
Artists retain copyright of their work. There is no entry fee.

All submissions must be submitted electronically through Juried Art
Services. Note that there is no fee for using Juried Art Services. The entry
page can be found at the following link: http://bit.ly/VTfT6E or, the full
URL:
http://www.juriedartservices.com/index.php?content=event_info&event_id=614.

Entries must be submitted by February 14, 2013.

All visuals submitted must represent work that is original in design. A
maximum of four entries per artist is allowed, so please submit your best
work. An entry may consist of no more than two visuals: an overall shot and
one detail (or alternate view); the detail shots are not required. The
primary images you submit should each be different designs. For example,
please do not submit four variations of very similar beads; instead, submit
one bead from each of four series.

Important: Lark will only publish photos of entries containing images and
text that are free of copyright or for which the artist (or approved
institution) holds copyright.

I've already received two questions repeatedly about this call for entries,
so I'll answer them here: My model for the work in the book is Showcase 1000
Glass Beads. That means most of the photos are of a bead or beads, but some
photographs of beads incorporated in jewelry or other artwork, in which the
beads are highlighted, will be considered. Ultimately those choices will
rest in the juror's final decision-making. Also, beaded beads are acceptable
as submissions.

Thank you for your participation, either in submitting entries yourself or
sharing the call for entries with your craft community.

Please join us on Facebook, as well:
http://www.facebook.com/LarkJewelryBeading.

Thank you!
Ray Hemachandra
Lark Jewelry & Beading

67 Broadway
Asheville, North Carolina 28801
(828) 253-0467 ext. 762
ray@larkbooks.com
http://www.larkcrafts.com/jewelry-beading

Posted in beads | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

Learn To Pearl Knot

Posted by learntobead on January 21, 2013

Pearl Knotting with Warren Feld
By: Warren Feld
http://www.craftartedu.com/warren-feld-pearl-knotting-with-warren-feld
pearl10-full-moneyshot-hi-res-medium

New video tutorail on CraftArtEdu.com.

Everything you need to know for successfully designing with pearls, including knotting – traditional vs non traditional methods, attaching clasps, finishing, care of your pearls, repair and types of pearls, the nature of the pearl. Jewelry designer Warren Feld will lead you through this comprehensive CraftArtEdu class that is all about pearls. 6 Broadcasts.
Price:
$40
Level: All Levels
Duration: 106:17

Posted in beads, jewelry making, Workshops, Classes, Exhibits | Leave a Comment »

LARK PUBLICATIONS: Call For Entries

Posted by learntobead on June 10, 2012

LARK PUBLICATIONS
CALL FOR ENTRIES
8/1/2012 deadline
I received the following email from Ray Hemachandra of Lark Publications. They are
requesting submissions to possible be included ina book to be published called Showcase
500 Necklaces. -- Warren
"I'm pleased to announce a two-month call for entries for a new 500 Series gallery book of handmade contemporary jewelry from Lark Books: Showcase 500 Necklaces. The opportunity closes on August 1, 2012. That is a short window of time, so I ask you please to share the call for entries promptly with your entire jewelry-making community, including peers, associations, schools, students, and all online forums as well as social media like Twitter and Facebook, and to respond to it yourself in a timely way. As always, we hope to receive a wide array of entries from around the world. I'm also pleased to report Lark has converted to using an online entry system; entries are now online only, through a portal provided by Juried Art Services. Here is the link for the informational prospectus and to enter: http://bit.ly/NmsmQm


You'll find all the information you need at that link, so please follow the instructions carefully, but here are some key points: We'll accept jewelry in all materials with all techniques and design styles, including both wearable and conceptual but biasing toward the wearable, simply because most readers prefer seeing wearable jewelry in these books. Jurying will favor more recent work, and so we ask you to submit very recent or current work from no earlier than 2010. The submission limit is two pieces (one photo of each, with an option of one or two alternate or detail photos per piece). 'Necklaces' can include neckpieces, chokers, torques, collars, operas, ropes, chains, bibs, etc. There is no charge for entry for this book; Lark is covering the Juried Art Services cost. We strongly prefer work that has not been previously published in book form. The JAS form will walk you through the process, but a few notes: 1. No need to complete the Artist Statement section. 2. Please read and follow Lark's Digital Image Submission Guidelines. 3. We encourage early entries, especially to avoid having any last-minute difficulties with the new entry process: Complete the process ahead of the deadline so you're assured of having time to resolve any technical issues you might encounter. For questions about registering with Juried Art Services or uploading your material to the site, contact support@jurying.net. For other questions about the book, please direct them to Hannah Doyle at hannah@larkbooks.com. And please be sure to join Lark Jewelry & Beading on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/LarkJewelryBeading for updates and future calls for entries. We invite you to copy the web ad for the book at http://www.larkcrafts.com/submit/calls-for-submissions/ for your own website or blog, or to share it on your Facebook page, linking either to that link or to the JAS page at http://bit.ly/NmsmQm, whichever you prefer. We are very excited about this book, the third jewelry book since the 500 series evolved into 'Showcase 500'. Showcase 500 Rings (http://amzn.to/yEERZm ) just published in May, and Showcase 500 Beaded Jewelry (http://amzn.to/z6tZH2) will publish in August. We know Showcase 500 Necklaces will be a book devoted to work of creative excellence and innovation, and we invite and welcome your contribution to the book. Thank you very much. Sincerely, Ray Join us on Facebook: facebook.com/LarkJewelryBeading Follow us on Pinterest: pinterest.com/larkjewelry Ray Hemachandra Team Lead and Business Manager Lark Jewelry & Beading 67 Broadway Asheville, North Carolina 28801 (828) 253-0467 ext. 762 ray@larkbooks.com
http://www.larkcrafts.com/jewelry-beading"

Posted in bead weaving, beads, beadwork, jewelry design, jewelry making | Tagged: , | 2 Comments »

Piece accepted for inclusion 500 BEADED JEWELRY book

Posted by learntobead on February 8, 2012

Just found out that one of my pieces — Little Tapestries/Ghindia — was juried into the book SHOWCASE 500 BEADED JEWELRY, Lark Publications. The book comes out August 2012, but is already listed on Amazon.com at http://amzn.to/z6tZH2 .

From Amazon.com:

This book gathers photographs of 500 of the most breathtaking beaded jewelry designs created in recent years. The techniques the beaders employ are as varied as the aesthetic sensibilities they bring to their gorgeous creations and include beadweaving in every stitch imaginable, embroidery, quilling, loom weaving, and kumihimo braiding, as well as basic stringing, simple wirework, and fine metalwork. Sometimes, a bead maker’s focal piece simply is set in a straightforward, unpretentious, and beautiful design.

 

Virtually all of the world’s most famous beaders who make jewelry have pieces included — including Carol Wilcox Wells, Diane Fitzgerald, Marcia DeCoster, Jamie Cloud Eakin, Huib Petersen, Paulette Baron, Sabine Lippert, Sherry Serafini, Margie Deeb, Maggie Meister, Melanie Potter, Ann Tevepaugh Mitchell, Laura McCabe, Suzanne Golden, Jean Campbell, Rachel Nelson-Smith, Eva Dobos, and many more — but we also present work from many artists who have never been published before. All together, this extensive, international, and fabulous survey of 500 pieces includes work from nearly 300 artists from 30 countries and reveals the striking vision and ambition of today’s beading community.

Posted in beads, beadwork, jewelry design | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

APPLIED FASHION

Posted by learntobead on November 14, 2011

APPLIED FASHION

Women don’t just wear pieces of jewelry – they inhabit them.

Buying a piece of jewelry for yourself – a necklace, a bracelet, earrings, a brooch, something else – isn’t a task easily given to someone else.  It’s often not a spur of the moment thing either.  You just don’t rush off to the local boutique or the local Wal-Mart, grab whatever you see, and go home.

I’m not talking about that impulse buy during your leisurely visit to the mall.   I’m referring to purchasing those pieces of jewelry you know will have to do a lot of the hard work to accessorize your wardrobe and help you get the compliments and notice of your family, friends and c o-workers you comport with and compete with each and every day.

No, buying a piece of jewelry for yourself is a multi-purposed moment, one which must be thought through carefully and one which must be savored.  Lest you buy the wrong piece.  That doesn’t really go with what you intend to wear.  Or is over-priced.  Or poorly made.  Or conveys the wrong impression about status.  Or is out of fashion.  Or something one of your friends already has.

The jewelry you buy has to conform to quite a long list of essential criteria before you could ever think of buying it.  It is something you will wear more than once.  As such, it is your companion.  Your necklace is not merely lying around your neck.  Or your bracelet around your wrist.  Or your earrings dangling from your ears.

Jewelry can cause you to lose face with others.  It can irritate or scratch your skin, or get caught up in your hair.  It might weigh you down or stretch or tear your ear lobes.  Jewelry can break without warning in the most unexpected and embarrassing of places.  It can get caught on things, sometimes hurting you in the process.

Jewelry conveys to the world something about who you really are, or think you are.  As such, jewelry is very personal.  Your private, innermost, most soul searching choices made very public for all to see.

As you caress it, as you touch the smooth or faceted or creviced beads and metal parts or the clasp or the material the beads are strung on, when you twist and move the piece within your hand, you are confirming to yourself the extent to which your jewelry is doing its job.

When you buy new jewelry, the dilemmas multiply.  How will  the new compare to the old?  Will it be able to handle all these responsibilities – looking good, representing you, fitting in with your wardrobe, meeting the expectations of others?  Like divorcing, then remarrying, changing your jewelry can take some time for readjustment.

And you do not want to be seen as noncommittal to your jewelry.  This would sort of be like going to  a hotel, but not unpacking your suitcase while staying in the room.   Conveying some sort of social or psychological distance from your jewelry can be very unsettling for others.

So you need to inhabit it.  You need to inhabit your jewelry, wear it with conviction, pride and satisfaction.  Be one with it.

Inhabiting jewelry often comes with a price.  There becomes so much pressure to buy the “right” pieces, given all the roles we demand our jewelry to play, that we too often stick with the same brands, the same colors, the same styles, the same silhouettes.  We get stuck in this rut and are afraid to step out of it.

Or we wear too many pieces of jewelry.  The long earrings, plus the cuff bracelets on both arms, plus the head band, plus the hair ornament, plus the 7-strand necklace, plus the 5 rings.  We are ever uncertain which piece or pieces will succeed at what, so hopefully, at least some combination or subset of what we wear will work out.

In a similar way, we wear over-embellished pieces – lots of charms, lots of dangles, lots of fringe, lots of strands.  Something will surely be the right color, the right fit and proportion, the right fashion, the right power statement, the right reflection of me.

And our need to inhabit our jewelry comes with one more price.  We are too willing to overpay for poorly made pieces in our desperation to have that right look.  The $100.00 of beads strung on elastic string.  The poorly dyed stones which fade in the light.  The poorly crimped and overly stiff pieces with little ease for accommodating movement and frequent wear.

It is OK to inhabit our jewelry.  In fact, it is necessary, given all we want jewelry to do for us.   But we need to be smart about it.  We need to learn to recognize better designs and better designers.

This need not be expensive at all.

Just smarter.

Posted in beads, jewelry making | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Go VOTE – Beaded Tapestry Competition

Posted by learntobead on November 4, 2011

Semi-Finalists Chosen!
Beaded Tapestry Competition 

GO VOTE OnLine:  Voting ends 1/14/2012

Visit the web-pages of each of our 4 Beaded Tapestry Competition Semi-Finalists.

International 2011
THE ILLUSTRATIVE BEADER:
BEADED TAPESTRY COMPETITION
Theme: Mystery Genre Book Covers

#1. KAY FIELDEN
Auckland, New Zealand
“The Lovely Bones” by Alice Sebold

#2. JUNE JACKSON and JAMIE BRUNS
Bryan, Texas
“Lizzie Borden” by Elizabeth Engstrom

#3. DOT LEWALLEN
Westerville, Ohio
“Black Notice” by Patricia Cornwell

#4. PATTY ROCKHILL
O’Brien, Florida
“When Night Falls”
by Jenna Ryan

Evaluate their images, their write-ups, and their materials and techniques.
Then use the on-line form you will find at the bottom of each of their web-pages
to Score them in terms of
Visual Appeal,
Artist Insight,
Artist Technique, and
Use of Beads in the Design.

The judges were blown away by the quality of all 4 semifinalists.   It was truly amazing how well each artist captured the essence of their book.  Each artist brought these books to life within their book cover design.  Yet each artist’s approach was different.  These artists should commend themselves on the amount of thought, insight, and coordination of ideas and techniques which went into producing their Beaded Tapestry pieces.    Bravo!

Here we use the concept of “Tapestry” in its broadest sense as a stitched, sewn and/or woven wall hanging. Your tapestry may be woven, loomed, stitched, quilted, cross-stitched, crocheted, knitted, sewn, braided, knotted, embroidered, macrame’d, beaded and the like. Your tapestry will combine fibers/threads/and/or cloth and beads in some way, and the surface area must consist of at least 70% beads. Beads may be used in many ways, such as forming the background canvas of your piece, and/or embellishing your canvas, and/or as fringe, and/or as stitchery covering parts of your piece. Your piece should be mounted or framed in some way, ready for hanging on a wall. Your tapestry may utilize many different techniques.

GO VOTE OnLine:  Voting ends 1/14/2012

http://www.landofodds.com/store/tapestry1contest.htm

Posted in bead weaving, beads, beadwork, Contests | Leave a Comment »

New First Dibs Sale

Posted by learntobead on September 13, 2011

New First Dibs Sale
at Land of Odds (www.landofodds.com)
thru Mon, 9/26/11
Support our Sponsor 

Our FIRST DIBS SALES.
Don’t Miss Them!!!!!
Get merchandise at wholesale prices before we begin to price, merchandise and store it!

HIGHLIGHTS :

AMBER FIRE AGATE YELLOW (dyed)

BLACK ONYX

BLACK VEINED GRAY AGATE

BLUE FIRE AGATE (dyed)

GREEN BROWN FIRE AGATE (dyed)

GREEN CARAMEL AGATE (dyed)

PASTEL GREEN AND BLACK BANDED AGATE (dyed)

PINK BANDED AGATE (dyed)

PURPLE BANDED AGATE (dyed)

RED AGATE (dyed)

RED JADE (dyed)

RUBY JADE (dyed)

WHITE AND BROWN FIRE AGATE

WHITE LINED BLACK AGATE

Sale found here:
www.landofodds.com/store/firstdibson.htm

 

Posted in beads | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

New Column Posted to “How To Bead A Rogue Elephant”

Posted by learntobead on September 2, 2011

New Column Posted
“How To Bead A Rogue Elephant”

Getting Started in Beading and Jewelry Making
Excerpts from this book on the following topics…
Click here 

– Catching the “Bead-Bug”
– What Can You Do With Beads
– Getting Started
– Finding Inspirations
– Shopping for Beads
– What To Look For In A  Bead
– How Not To Shop
– Be A Good Customer
– Buyer Beware
– Tips for Buying Beads At A Bead Show
– What Should I Create?
– Planning Your Necklace
– Anatomy of a Necklace
– Measurements You Need to Know
– Working from a Palette
– How Do You Learn?
– The Types of Things You Need to Learn
– On My Own, Through Books, or Through Classes?
– Reading Patterns and Instructions
– Self-Esteem — Making Choices
– Selling vs. Keeping
– Beading Aphorisms

Posted in bead weaving, beads, beadwork, jewelry design, Learn To Bead | 2 Comments »

Beads Display No Powers Here

Posted by learntobead on November 17, 2010

Beads Display No Powers Here

I visited Vietnam this fall for about 3 weeks.    Somewhat to my surprise, I didn’t get the eyes-wide-open response to the Czech cut glass beads I had brought with me.

Outside Da Nang, we visited a farming village.    We went to a school.   I had brought some loose Czech cut glass beads to give away.    I handed some of the children some beads, and they were clueless.    They at first thought they were food.   I put one in each child’s hand, and held their hands up to the light.    But nothing.    No sense of excitement about the colors.    No sense of the bead.

I met a grandmother with 2 grandchildren, and tried to give the grandmother a bead.    Same thing – blank stare.   Put the bead in her hand, and held her hand up to the light.   Nothing.   She tried to give it to her grandchild, but I told her it was for her.    Such a different reaction to beads that I’ve found most other places.

I knew ahead of time that Vietnamese do not have a jewelry culture.   They don’t wear jewelry, and haven’t in their past.   They have few beads historically, and what beads have been found, were found in the Champa culture, which had originally settled the central part of the country.

But it is interesting that the Vietnamese sell strands of pearls and gemstones, as well as some beaded necklaces, to tourists.     At two stores in Saigon, one in a market, and one more established boutique, both of which sold jewelry made with beads, I tried to have a conversation about beads.    I drew pictures.  I explained how stringing beads creates a necklace or bracelet.    Blank looks.   I showed them the beaded strands of pearls and gemstones they sell, and they see these as “necklaces”, not “strands of beads”.    I showed one of them a bead-embellished scarf.     This made the concept of “beads” a little clearer for her, but she still saw the piece holistically as decoratively embellished, rather than something made up of individual beads.

Posted in beads | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

GROUPON Coupon for Be Dazzled Beads, 5/6

Posted by learntobead on May 5, 2010

Groupon Coupon online for Be Dazzled, May 6-9
http://www.groupon.com/deals/be-dazzled-beads

GET YOUR GROUPON COUPON
For Be Dazzled Beads
$20.00 for $40.00 of merchandise

Look for their SIDE DEAL in their email offers
Between May 6th and 9th,

or go directly to their website to get the coupon.

If you’re not registered for GROUPON, check them out:
www.groupon.com
They have incredible deals, almost daily, for Nashville. Mostly restaurants.

This time we are their Side Deal.     This means that the link to the coupon is a little bit down on the page on the email they send you.    The main heading on the email they send will reference another business.

Groupon is a fun advertisting program.    For a deal to become active, a minimum number of people have to register for it, in our case, 25.     So tell your Nashville Area friends, on FaceBook, My Space, and whereever you’re linked.   The coupons are good for 6 months.     You’ll get $40.00 of merchandise for $20.00.

Other store discounts do not apply with this offer.

Posted in beads, Stitch 'n Bitch | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Using Beads/Jewelry As Economic Development Tool

Posted by learntobead on April 15, 2010

Using Beads and Jewelry
As Tools For Community and Economic Development

Recently, I read a column by Nicholas Kristof in the New York Times entitled Partying to Change the World.

I wanted to share this link with you.

In the article Kristof discusses the work of BeadforLife.

Here two women created an economic support system based on the talents of African women who make beads from trash, and the profit-motive — selling the beads in finished jewelry at home parties in America, and reinvesting this money back in the local enterprises in Africa.  

Moreover, they developed an educational program about Africa for American schools.    The motivation was marketing, but the outcomes far exceed that.

Fascinating story and case study.    I meet many people each year who work with local villagers around the world, to help them find markets for their jewelry, better beading supplies for their craft, and strategies for improving productivity in their efforts.     Here’s a very full and flushed out operation to learn from.

Posted in beads, business of craft | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Pearls

Posted by learntobead on February 25, 2010

PEARLS

There is a major international exhibition of pearls at the Qatar Museum.   The exhibition covers the range of types of pearls, the history of pearls and the pearl industry, designer jewelry made from pearls.   Unfortunatetly, it’s been difficult to find any images of pieces on display.

The Qatar Pearl Monument

I have been able to find some images of the types of things on display.

Melo Collection of Myanmar Pearls
Black Pearls from Mexico
Mikimoto Pearls
Yagumura Pearl Jewelry
Work by Professor Henry Hanni
Conch Pearls
Harvesting Oysters for Pearls

Melo Pearl


Melo pearl in ring

Snail with Melo Pearl

Nautalus Pearls

Deco Pearl Necklace

Cross section of  a pearl

South seas pearls

Mikimoto Necklace

Yagumura bracelet

Pearl in the oyster shell

Conch Pearls

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